Root-Maggot Fly
( Anthomyiidae )


2011-0511-SP111001-DIP00470-Anthomyiidae[1651h13s,F,A,post]{SPeden}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Anthomyiidae
(Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830)
Common Name:Root-Maggot Fly
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Diptera
Family:Anthomyiidae
Taxon Code:DIP00470
ITIS TSN#:148685

LOCATION DETAILS
Location
Henry Cowell Redwoods SP, Henry Cowell Redwoods SP, 101 North Big Trees Park Road, Felton
County:Santa Cruz County
ECI Site#:CASP111001
Park/Forest:Henry Cowell Redwoods SP

RECOGNITION
Small to medium-sized flies, usually yellow, brown, gray or blackish; well-developed calypter at base of each wing; resemble muscid flies but more slender; wings sometimes clouded with gray or brown; legs yellowish to black. R5 cell parallel-sided, 2A reaches margin of wing, at least as a fold; hypopleura without bristles, often only one sternopleural bristle. Except for a few species with distinctive color patterns, identification to genus requires observation dorsal and lateral views, views of leg and thorax bristle patterns, as well as the calypters, and antenna. Some genera can only be identified by dissection.

BIOLOGY
Food
Most larval Anthomyiidae are plant feeders, and their habit of invading roots gave them the name root maggots. Some species feed on dung, others are entomophagous. Adult flies are mainly predaceous, most frequently attacking other Diptera, often of the same family. Most entomophagous species are predaceous, although some species are primary, internal, solitary or gregarious parasitoids. A number of predaceous species attack the egg pods of grasshoppers and locusts, while the adults of other species are predaceous on other flies, often members of the same family. Most adults feed on nectar, but others may feed on pollen.
Habitat
Adults can often be seen on flowers in wooded habitats. They also are common in fields.
Development
Development is varied, based on the ecologies of the genera and species.
Importance
The genus Della in this family have important pests, including the Onion Fly (D. antiqua), the Wheat Bulb Fly (D. coarctata), the Turnip Root Fly (D. floralis), the Bean Seed Fly (D. platura) and the Cabbage Root Fly (D. radicum).
Distribution
Throughout North America and the world.

HABITAT
Adults can often be seen on flowers in wooded habitats. They also are common in fields.

CREDITS
Photographer
Scott Peden

REFERENCES
  • Family Anthomyiidae - Root-Maggot Flies (http://bugguide.net/node/view/8083/). Accessed January 30, 2016. [ IMAGES ]
  • Integrated Taxonomic Information System TSN#148685
  • Anthomyiidae. (http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~legneref/identify/anthomyi.htm). Accessed January 30, 2016.


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