Beetle
( Coleoptera )


2014-0420-EB550148-COL02005-Coleoptera[1437h57s,F,A,plant-flower]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Coleoptera
(Linnaeus ,1758 )
Common Name:Beetle
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Coleoptera
Taxon Code:COL02005
ITIS/TSN:109216

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Tilden Regional Park, Tilden Regional Park, Tilden Regional Park, Berkeley
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CAEB550000
Open Space Location:Tilden Regional Park

RECOGNITION
Description
Adult: elytra (forewings) horny or leathery, almost always meeting in a straight line down the back and covering the membranous hindwings that are usually longer than the elytra, and folded beneath the elytra when not in use. In some groups the elytra are short and do not fully cover the abdomen. One or both pairs of wings are rarely reduced or absent. The antennae typically 11-segmented (rarely more or less) and variable in shape. The tarsi 3- to 5-segmented. Abdomen commonly has 5 segments visible, sometimes with up to 8. Mouthparts of adults and most larvae adapted for chewing. Larva: variable in form, hardness of body, and development of appendages, but commonly with hardened (sclerotized) head capsule, 3 pairs of thoracic legs and soft body.
Body Length
0.3-200 mm
Diversity
The largest order in the animal kingdom, with close to 390,000 described species in almost 30,000 genera of 176 families worldwide, representing about 40% of known insects. About 25,000 described (close to 28,000 estimated) spp. in ~130 families are known from America, north of Mexico and ~8200 in Canada.
Similar Taxa
Dermaptera (earwigs) have pincer-like appendages at the tip of the abdomen. Heteroptera (true bugs) have mouthparts adapted for sucking, not chewing; front wings rarely meet in a straight line. Blattaria (cockroaches).

BIOLOGY
Food
Various plant, fungal, and animal matter.
Habitat
Virtually any terrestrial and freshwater habitat.
Range
Worldwide.
Diversity
The largest order in the animal kingdom, with close to 390,000 described species in almost 30,000 genera of 176 families worldwide, representing about 40% of known insects. About 25,000 described (close to 28,000 estimated) spp. in ~130 families are known from America, north of Mexico and ~8200 in Canada.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
ITIS.


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