Field Cricket
( Gryllus sp. )


2011-0522-EB380001-ORTZZZZZ-Gryllus_sp[2114h06s,P,A,nearfwdlaterum]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT
Crickets are well-known for their ability to sing. In some species, chirps per minute can be used to tell temperature. Winged adults may fly. Crickets are distinguished from grasshoppers by their long versus short antennae; and hopping versus jumping behavior. Field Crickets are dark brown to black, they are general feeders, but feed chiefly on vegetative matter. Nymphs look like adults. Females possess a long egg-laying organ (ovipositor), through which eggs are laid in soil. Field Crickets are also known as House Crickets.

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Gryllus sp.
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Common Name:Field Cricket
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Polyneoptera
Order:Orthoptera
Suborder:Ensifera
Family:Gryllidae
Subfamily:Gryllinae
Genus:Gryllus
Taxon Code:ORT00270
ITIS/TSN:657701

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Morgan Territory, Curry Creek, Morgan Territory, Clayton
County:Contra Costa County
ECI Site#:CAEB380000
Park/Forest Code:Morgan Territory

RECOGNITION
Description
Field cricket adults are shiny black or brown with long, thin antennae. They vary in body length from 15?25 mm depending on the species. While both males and females are very similar, females can be identified by the presence of an ovipositor, about 19 mm long, between the cerci at the end of the abdomen. In some species ovipositor length is used to distinguish species.
Body Length
15-30 mm

BIOLOGY

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
BugGuide .
ITIS ITIS TSN#.
Field Cricket <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_cricket>
UC IPM Pest Management Guidelines: Lettuce. <http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r441300511.html>. UC ANR Publication 3450.


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