Seven-spotted Lady Beetle
( Coccinella septempunctata )


2009-0430-EB330001-COL00562-Coccinella_septempunctata[1324h04s,F,A,plant-leaf]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Coccinella septempunctata
(Linnaeus ,1758 )
Common Name:Seven-spotted Lady Beetle
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Coleoptera
Suborder:Polyphaga
Family:Coccinellidae
Subfamily:Coccinellinae
Genus:Cocinella
Taxon Code:COL00562
ITIS/TSN:114347

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline, Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline, Martin Luther King Regional Shoreline, EBRPD, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CAEB330000
Open Space Location:Martin Luther King Regional Shoreline, EBRPD

RECOGNITION
Recognition
BugGuide.net: "Adults comparatively large (7-8 mm) with a white or pale spot on either side of the head. Larva black with orange markings."
Description
Adult: The body is as dorsally convex as C. californica. However, this lady beetle has only 3 spots on each elytron with 1 additional spot on each elytron at the scutellum which, together, form a single large spot - for a total of 7 spots. The pronotum is black with a large white spot on either side. The head also has a pair of white spots between the eyes. The underside, legs and antennae are all black. The eyes are gray. Larva: Instars can be variable in color depending on temperature, but are generally dark and highly segmented. Pupa: The pupa is slate grey to black, sometimes having white or orange markings on the outside. It has a hardened exoskeleton which develops from the fourth instar. Its size is approximately the size of the adult.
Body Length
Adult: 6.5-7.8 mm.
Colors
Color1: red Color2: black

BIOLOGY
Importance
As both adult and larva, this beetle is such an effective predator of aphids that it has been designated the State Insect in Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. It was introduced repeatedly into the US from Europe to control aphids from 1956 to 1971. All attempts failed until, in 1973, an established population was found in New Jersey which spread naturally throughout North America.
Range
Throughout North America and most of the Old World.
Distribution
Throughout North America and most of the Old World.
Development
Females from 250-500 eggs in their life. Females may mate with multiple males. Females seek areas where females of the species have already laid eggs. After emergence, the larva eats its egg casing and any infertile eggs nearby. The larva first feeds by sucking liquids from aphids, and subsequent instars consume the entire insect. There are 4 instars. 4th instar larvae attach to many kinds of substrates. Eclosing adults have no pigmentation but gain their colors in a few hours.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Species Coccinella septempunctata - Seven-spotted Lady Beetle. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/3543). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.
Coccinella septempunctata - sevenspotted lady beetle. (http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Coccinella_septempunctata/). Accessed September 24, 2016.


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