Stink Bug
( Pentatomidae )


2011-0730-EB190131-HET01621-Pentatomidae[1324h37s,F,N,tree-leaf-oak]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Pentatomidae
(Leach ,1815 )
Common Name:Stink Bug
Life Stage:(N) nymph/naiad

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Paraneoptera
Order:Hemiptera
Suborder:Heteroptera
Family:Pentatomidae
Taxon Code:HET01621
ITIS/TSN:108628

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Del Valle Reservoir, Del Valle Reservoir, Del Valle Reservoir, Livermore
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CAEB190130
Open Space Location:Del Valle Reservoir

RECOGNITION
Description
Body: Broad, shield-shaped. Head: Relatively small and often "tucked into" a concavity in anterior margin of pronotum. Antennae: 5-segmented. Scutellum: Large and triangular. Eyes: Ocelli present.
Body Length
5-18 mm.

BIOLOGY
Food
The majority are herbivorous, but members of the subfamily Asopinae are predaceous on other insects. Both adults and nymphs of plant-feeding species may damage plants, mostly by piercing the plant tissues and thus opening a path for pathogens to enter the plant. Many species, whether primarily herbivorous or predaceous, are generalist feeders.
Range
Worldwide and throughout North America.
Active Period
Spring through fall.
Development
Barrel-shaped eggs are laid on the underside of leaves in clusters with tight rows; in early spring, overwintered adult females seek out suitable hosts and typically deposit their eggs on wild host plants. Overwintering populations are commonly found along field borders, particularly along tree lines near their overwintering sites. Later-developing cultivated plants become more attractive when these initial wild hosts dry down, and their proximity allows easy access for stink bug colonization in crops; emerging nymphs are gregarious and remain on/near the egg mass, then begin to feed and disperse as they grow. Overwinter usually as adults under ground cover or leaf litter. Eggs generally laid in spring; uni- to multi- voltine. Overwintering adults often become conspicuous guests in homes; many spp. come to lights, sometimes in numbers.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
ITIS.


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