Araneae
( Araneae )


2010-0215-EB070001-ARA00670-Araneae[1347h44s,F,S,web]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Araneae
(Hentz, 1757)
Common Name:Araneae
Life Stage:(S) subadult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Arachnida
Order:Araneae
Suborder:Opisthothelae
Taxon Code:ARA00670
ITIS/TSN:82732

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Briones Regional Park, Briones Regional Park, Briones Regional Park, Lafayette
County:Contra Costa County
ECI Site#:CAEB070000
Park/Forest Code:Briones Regional Park

RECOGNITION
Recognition
Two body parts: cephalothorax and abdomen. Eight legs attached to cephalothorax.
Description
Form: Spider have two main body sections: cephalothorax and abdomen, eight legs attached to cephalothorax and visible silk glands. Eyes: Eye arrangement can help identify spiders to family. Color: Body patterns can help identify a spider to genus, and sometimes to species. Genitalia: Close-ups views of the epigynum are diagnostic to species for adult females. Palpi: Close-up lateral views of the palpi are diagnostic to species for adult males.

BIOLOGY
Food
Spiders eat whatever insects are available in their environment. Web-making spiders catch prey with a web structure. Hunting spiders ambush prey without the use of a web.
Habitat
Spider species have evolved to fit into their respective environments. Spiders in hot, dry climates can live without as much water as spiders from more humid climates. Spiders that live alongside humans have evolved to survive indoors where there is very little food or water available.
Importance
Despite all the rumors and misconstrued information, the only Araneid species of medical importance in California is the Black Widow Spider (Latrodectus spp.). Spiders do not seek human contact.
Importance
Despite all the rumors and misconstrued information, the only Araneid species of medical importance in California is the Black Widow Spider (Latrodectus spp.). Spiders do not seek human contact.
Development
Generally, spider developmental stages includes includes an egg, spiderling, immature, juvenile, subadult and penultimate (before adult) and adult. Spiders molt from about 4-12 times to reach adulthood. True spiders, or araneomorphs, will not molt after maturity. In contrast, the mygalomorph spiders live much, much longer and continue to molt once or twice a year through their long adult lives.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Order Araneae - Spiders. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/1954). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.


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