Praying Mantis
( Mantodea )


2011-0928-EB040000-MAN01070-Mantodea[1504h40s,F,A,plant]{MDame}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Mantodea
(Burmeister ,1838 )
Common Name:Praying Mantis
Life Stage:(A) adult
Sex:female

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Dictyoptera
Order:Mantodea
Taxon Code:MAN01070
ITIS/TSN:666589

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Bay Point Regional Shoreline, Bay Point Regional Shoreline, Bay Point Regional Shoreline, McAvoy Road, Bay Point
County:Contra Costa County
ECI Site#:CAEB040000
Open Space Location:Bay Point Regional Shoreline

RECOGNITION
Recognition
Relatively large, elongate insects up to several inches long. Typical features include triangular heads with large compound eyes set on either side and usually three ocelli in between; very flexible articulation between the head and prothorax providing great mobility and allowing a mantid to 'look over its shoulder'; raptorial forelegs used to capture prey
Description
Relatively large, elongate insects up to several inches long. Typical features include triangular heads with large compound eyes set on either side and usually three ocelli in between; very flexible articulation between the head and prothorax providing great mobility and allowing a mantid to 'look over its shoulder'; raptorial forelegs used to capture prey
Body Length
Worldwide: 1-17 cm.
Diversity
20 Species in 12 genera in America north of Mexico. About 2,300 species worldwide, arranged in 14 families and about 430 genera.
Similar Taxa
Mantisflies (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) also have: 1) elongate pronota, 2) elongate abdomens, 3) prehensive forelegs and a 4) trinagular head.

BIOLOGY
Food
Typically other arthropods; can be highly cannibalistic. Large mantids sometimes prey on small birds, lizards, and amphibians.
Diversity
20 Species in 12 genera in America north of Mexico. About 2,300 species worldwide, arranged in 14 families and about 430 genera.
Active Period
North American species usually live from spring to late autumn with eggs overwintering; tropical mantids may live longer.
Development
Metamorphosis incomplete, generally with seven or more molts before maturity. Eggs are laid late in the season in an egg case, or ootheca (first foamy, then papery after the foam sets) and hatch en masse in the spring. Most individuals seen in the field are gravid females; males are often eaten by females immediately after mating.

CREDITS
Photographer
Mike Dame
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Order Mantodea - Mantids. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/342391). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.


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