Digger Wasp
( Sphecidae )


2014-0504-38000003-HYM02057-Sphecidae[1350h53s,F,A,plant-leaf]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Sphecidae
(Latreille ,1802 )
Common Name:Digger Wasp
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Hymenoptera
Suborder:Apocrita
Family:Sphecidae
Taxon Code:HYM02057
ITIS/TSN:154310

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
San Francisco, San Francisco, 2290 14th Ave (Herbert Hoover Middle School), San Francisco
County:San Francisco County
ECI Site#:CA38000000

RECOGNITION
Description
Abdomen long and stalked (petiolate), giving the body a thread-waisted appearance; middle tibiae with two apical spurs; body may be all black (sometimes tinged with metallic blue or green), black and red, yellow and black, or white and black.
Body Length
10-30 mm.
Diversity
125 Species in 11 genera in North America, more than 720 species in 19 genera worldwide; 21 species in Canada; 44 species in the eastern United States.

BIOLOGY
Food
Larvae feed on the paralyzed bodies of a variety of arthropods (the host varies according to wasp species) provided to them by adult wasps; common hosts include spiders, grasshoppers, and caterpillars. Adults feed on nectar from flowers and extrafloral nectaries, honeydew, and body fluids of their prey.
Nesting Preferences
Most species nest in the ground, usually in areas that have sparse or no vegetation; some species construct aerial nests composed of mud; a few species nest in hollow plant stems or abandoned bee burrows in logs.
Range
Much of North America and the world.
Diversity
125 Species in 11 genera in North America, more than 720 species in 19 genera worldwide; 21 species in Canada; 44 species in the eastern United States.
Development
The large majority of species are solitary nesters; some species are kleptoparasitic, using prey caught by other wasps in order to provide it to their own larvae.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Family Sphecidae - Thread-waisted Wasps. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/135). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.


.