Wolf Spider
( Lycosidae )


2014-0504-38000003-ARA02051-Lycosidae[1157h01s,F,A,gravidfemale]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Lycosidae
(Sundevall ,1833 )
Common Name:Wolf Spider
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Arachnida
Order:Araneae
Family:Lycosidae
Taxon Code:ARA02051
ITIS/TSN:847731

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
San Francisco, San Francisco, 2290 14th Ave (Herbert Hoover Middle School), San Francisco
County:San Francisco County
ECI Site#:CA38000000

RECOGNITION
Recognition
These are common spiders. They can grow quite large. Eyes are arranged in 3 row - the pair in the second row are largest. The cephalothorax bears dark vertical strips, which are characteristic of the family. Agelenopsis (Grass Spiders) have similar markings.
Description
Eyes: 8 Dark eyes of unequal size arranged in three rows: Top row with a pair of large, forward-facing eyes, and a pair of large lateral eyes; and a bottom row of 4 front eyes of similar size and shape. Abdomen and cephalothorax: As long as wide. Legs: Long with three microscopic claws at each tip.
Body Length
2.2-35.0 mm.
Diversity
About 240 species in 21 genera in America north of Mexico. Exact numbers and recognized genera are subject to change.

BIOLOGY
Food
Mainly insects.
Habitat
Preferred habitat varies between species but includes open grasslands, suburban lawns, deciduous forests, deserts, coastal dunes, sandy soil and the wet terrain of marshes and swamps. Most live on the ground and hunt for prey at night. Dark mottled colors help camouflage spiders among the leaves. Except for those in the genus Sosippus, wolf spiders do not spin webs. Some dig burrows in the ground, others make holes under rocks, and many have no retreat at all.
Range
Throughout North America. Widespread from the Arctic to the Subtropics.
Diversity
About 240 species in 21 genera in America north of Mexico. Exact numbers and recognized genera are subject to change.
Development
Males courts potential mates by rhythmically waving pedipalpi. Females spin a spherical egg sac, attach it to spinnerets, and carry it until spiderlings emerge. Spiderlings clamber about on the female's back and are carried until they disperse.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Family Lycosidae - Wolf Spiders. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/1967). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.


.