Brown Lacewing
( Hemerobiidae )


2012-0623-01100147-NEU01402-Hemerobiidae[2223h37s,F,A,blacklight]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Hemerobiidae
(Latreille ,1802 )
Common Name:Brown Lacewing
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Neuropterida
Order:Neuroptera
Suborder:Hemerobiiformia
Family:Hemerobiidae
Taxon Code:NEU01402
ITIS/TSN:115080

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Joaquin Miller Park, Joaquin Miller Park, 3590 Sanborn Drive, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01100147

RECOGNITION
Recognition
Similar to Green Lacewings (Chrysopidae) but usually brown, smaller, wings usually more rounded, with membrane covered with small hairs and two or more radial sector veins.
Description
Adult: Similar to Green Lacewings (Chrysopidae) but usually brown and smalle. Wings: Usually more rounded, and the membrane is covered with small hairs. Venation with two or more radial sector veins. Larva: Debris is not carried on the backs, as with the larvae of the Chrysopidae.
Body Length
6-15 mm.
Diversity
58 Species in North America.

BIOLOGY
Food
Predaceous on soft-bodied insects, such as aphids, mealybugs and insect eggs, as both adults and larvae.
Habitat
Woodland areas.
Importance
Adults of some species may live for months and may consume many pest species. High reproductive capacity lends to this insect being a significant agent for biocontrol of pest insects in agriculture.
Range
Worldwide & throughout North America; more diverse in the western North America.
Diversity
58 Species in North America.
Active Period
Spring to fall.
Importance
Adults of some species may live for months and may consume many pest species. High reproductive capacity lends to this insect being a significant agent for biocontrol of pest insects in agriculture.
Development
Eggs are laid singly or in small groups, directly to leaves (not on stalks as the Chrysopidae). There are 3 larval instars, of which the 1st is active in all species. Mature larvae spin in white cocoon in a protected area. The cocoon has two layers: the outer later is loosely threaded, and it encloses an inner, more compactly threaded lining.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Family Hemerobiidae - Brown Lacewings. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/3577). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.
Brown Lacewings of Florida. (http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/brown_lacewings.htm). Accessed July 16, 2016.


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