Southern Green Stink Bug
( Nezara viridula )


2016-0612-01100112-HET02405-Nezara_viridula[1144h19s,F,N,plant-twig]{JJohnson-Metsa}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Nezara viridula
(Linnaeus ,1758 )
Common Name:Southern Green Stink Bug
Life Stage:(N) nymph/naiad

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Paraneoptera
Order:Hemiptera
Suborder:Heteroptera
Family:Pentatomidae
Subfamily:Pentatominae
Tribe:Nezarini
Genus:Nezara
Taxon Code:HET02405
ITIS/TSN:108925

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Gardens at Lake Merritt, Lakeside Park, 666 Bellevue, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01100110

RECOGNITION
Description
Adult: Green overall. Scutellum with a black dot in each basal corner. Antennae: Antennomeres 3 & 4 mostly reddish except at base. Connexivum uniformly colored (with no or very tiny dark dot on apical margin of each abdominal segment). Side of pronotum slightly concave in anterior half; second abdominal sternite has rounded medial spine; ventral scent gland pore short and broad. Nymphs: Nymphs undergo a remarkable change in coloration: first instars are light yellowish with red eyes and transparent legs and antennae; they stay clustered near the eggs and do not feed. Second instars have black head, legs, and antennae; the thorax is also black, with a yellow spot on each outer side. The abdomen is dark red to black with numerous white spots. Third and fourth instars differ from the second in size and an overall greenish color becoming apparent. Wing pads mark the arrival at the fifth instar. The abdomen is yellowish green with red spots on the median line.
Body Length
11-17 mm.
Colors
Color1: black Color2: red/orange Color3: yellow

BIOLOGY
Host
Highly polyphagous. Recorded from hundreds of species in more than 30 plant families, and attacks a wide variety of crop plants. Especially damaging to new shoots and fruits, including those of soybeans, peas, and cotton.
Range
Cosmopolitan, presumably of African and/or Mediterranean origin. In the United States, reported mostly from California and the southeast (i.e., Texas, Florida, Virginia and Oklahoma).
Development
White to yellow, barrel-shaped eggs are laid in clusters attached to the undersides of leaves. There are five instars and the life cycle is complete in 65-70 days. There are up to four generations per year in warm climates. The species overwinters as an adult.

CREDITS
Photographer
Juliene Johnson-Metsa
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
ITIS.


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