Moths
( Heterocera )


2014-0223-01100112-LEP01960-Heterocera[1450h54s,H,A,handheld]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Heterocera
)
Common Name:Moths
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Lepidoptera
Taxon Code:LEP01960

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Gardens at Lake Merritt, Lakeside Park, 666 Bellevue, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01100110

RECOGNITION
Description
Adult: Adults usually have feathery, thickened, or threadlike antennae, contrasted with knobbed or hooked antennae in butterflies, including the skippers (Hesperiidae), and most species are active at night. At rest, many species hold their wings out horizontally, or hugged over or around the abdomen. Rarely, the wings are held together vertically above the body, as butterflies do. Larvae: Larvae have a hardened head capsule and a fleshy body composed of a thorax bearing three pairs of legs, and an elongated cylindrical abdomen bearing from zero to five pairs of prolegs (short fleshy ventral projections used for clinging or walking). The body may be either uniformly colored or patterned with stripes, bands, or spots; the surface may be smooth, or may be sparsely or densely covered with short or long hairs, tufts of hair, spines, knobs, or other features. Larvae of moths are commonly called caterpillars (as are larvae of butterflies). However, the pupal case of moths is often covered in silk, commonly called a cocoon, contrasted with the typically naked chrysalis of butterflies.
Diversity
In North America there are some 11,000 described species of moths in about 70 families with about 165,000 described species worldwide. Many of the micromoths are yet undescribed.

BIOLOGY
Importance
Many kinds of moths are serious pests of ornamentals or in agriculture. Silk moths have been domesticated and are important in the silk industry. Many serve as food for humans an animals, alike.
Range
Worldwide.
Diversity
In North America there are some 11,000 described species of moths in about 70 families with about 165,000 described species worldwide. Many of the micromoths are yet undescribed.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Moths. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/82). Accessed March 21, 2016. .


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