Spider Wasp
( Pompilidae )


2012-0407-01100112-HYMZZZZZ-Pompilidae[1130h38s,F,A,plant-flower]{JohnWaite}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Pompilidae
(Facbricius, 1798)
Common Name:Spider Wasp
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Hymenoptera
Suborder:Apocrita
Family:Pompilidae
Taxon Code:HYM00153
ITIS/TSN:154286

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Gardens at Lake Merritt, Lakeside Park, 666 Bellevue, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01100110

RECOGNITION
Description
These wasps are typically dark colored with smoky or yellowish wings. A few are brightly colored. Bodies are slender. Legs and long and spiny. The hind femora typically extends beyond the end of abdomen. Tibiae of rear legs have two prominent spines at apex. Wings are not folded flat on top of abdomen. Mesopleuron has a transverse suture. Like the Vespidae, the Pompilidae have the pronotum extending back to the tegulae, the pronotum thus appearing triangular when viewed from the side and horseshoe-shaped when viewed from above.

BIOLOGY
These wasps are solitary. Adults may be seen at flowers on in search of prey on the ground. These wasps are efficient fliers.
Food
Larvae feed on spiders. In some groups the females sting and paralyze their prey and then transport it to a specially constructed nest before laying an egg; in others, leave the paralyzed spider in its nest and lay an egg upon it.
Host
A variety of spiders may be hosts, including wolf spiders (Lycosidae).
Development
Adult females paralyze spiders. Spiders are carried to a burrow where a single egg is laid on the abdomen of spider. The outermost chamber of the burrow is filled with dead ants that are a chemical barrier against predators. The larva hatches and feeds on the still-living spider, consuming its vital organs last. There are five instars. Pupation occurs in a silken cocoon. Eclosion typically occurs the following summer, but wasps may overwinter in the burrow.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
ITIS .
Wikipedia


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