( Coccinella septempunctata )



2012-0407-01100112-COL00562-Coccinella_septempunctata[1122h30s,F,A,plant-flower]{JohnWaite}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT
This beetle is such an effective predator against Aphids that, recognizing its importance as a biocontrol agent, it has been designated the State Insect in 6 states (Delaware, Massachussetts, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Tennessee). This is one of our comparatively larger Lady Beetles. It is highly convex and similar in shape, color and size to the California Lady Beetle (C. californica). However, this beetle has 3 spots on each elytron (wing cover). A 7th spot spans both elytra where they come together. Both the adults and larvae of this beetle are effective predators of aphids. For this reason it has been reintroduced from Europe, repeatedly, for biological control.

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Coccinella septempunctata
(L, 1758)
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Family:Coccinellidae
Taxon Code:COL00562
ITIS/TSN:114347

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Gardens at Lake Merritt, Lakeside Park, 666 Bellevue, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01100110

RECOGNITION
Recognition
BugGuide.net: "Adults comparatively large (7-8 mm) with a white or pale spot on either side of the head. Larva black with orange markings."
Body Length
7-8 mm

BIOLOGY
Importance
It has been repeatedly introduced in the US from Europe, (see Cornell U. Biocontrols) to control aphids. This widespread palearctic species was intentionally introduced into N. America several times from 1956 to 1971 for biological control of aphids. A11 of those attempts apparently failed in getting C. septempunctata established, but in 1973 an established population was found in Bergen Co., New Jersey. This population is thought to have been the result of an accidental introduction rather than a purposeful one (Angalet and Jacques, 1975). Since 1973, this species has spread naturally and been colonized and established in Delaware, Georgia, and Oklahoma. (Gordon 1985) It has since spread throughout North America.
Range
Throughout NA and most of the Old World.
Importance
It has been repeatedly introduced in the US from Europe, (see Cornell U. Biocontrols) to control aphids. This widespread palearctic species was intentionally introduced into N. America several times from 1956 to 1971 for biological control of aphids. A11 of those attempts apparently failed in getting C. septempunctata established, but in 1973 an established population was found in Bergen Co., New Jersey. This population is thought to have been the result of an accidental introduction rather than a purposeful one (Angalet and Jacques, 1975). Since 1973, this species has spread naturally and been colonized and established in Delaware, Georgia, and Oklahoma. (Gordon 1985) It has since spread throughout North America.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
BugGuide .
ITIS .


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