European Honey Bee
( Apis mellifera )


2014-0601-01100108-HYM00062-Apis_mellifera[1211h08s,F,A,plant-chamise-flower]{BWurzburg}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Apis mellifera
(Linnaeus ,1758 )
Common Name:European Honey Bee
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Hymenoptera
Suborder:Apocrita
Family:Apidae
Subfamily:Apinae
Tribe:Apini
Genus:Bombus
Taxon Code:HYM00062
ITIS/TSN:154396

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Knowland Park, Knowland Park, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01100108

RECOGNITION
Description
Traits cited in identifications on this site (not all unique to this species): hairy eyes; pollen carried in a ball on the legs; a long radial cell near the front wingtip. The vast majority of individuals seen will be females (workers), while sightings of males (drones) are relatively infrequent. Males are significantly bigger and have notably larger eyes which touch at the top of the head.
Body Length
Worker: 12 to 16 mm (½ to 5/8 in). Queen and drone are larger.
Colors
Color1: yellow Color2: black

BIOLOGY
Food
Nectar and pollen from flowers. Pollen is most important in feeding the larvae.
Habitat
Anywhere there are flowers to feed on and suitable hive-building sites.
Active Period
Honeybees workers heat the hive with body heat and cool the hive with their wings, so any hive has adults present year-round- but in cold weather they stay in the hives and live off their honey reserves.
Development
Eggs are laid by the queen in honeycomb cells and the wormlike larvae are fed by workers. Males grow up to be drones, but females can become either workers or queens, depending on what they're fed and what pheromones are present.Queens are normally the only reproductive females, though under some circumstances some workers can lay (usually infertile) eggs. Queens mate with the drones in flight, but only once: the queen will lay eggs continuously for the rest of her life without mating again. She releases pheromones that affect the bees in her hive in a variety of ways. The interactions between the queen and her hive are a complex story well worth investigating further.

CREDITS
Photographer
Beth Wurzburg

References
Species Apis mellifera - Western Honey Bee. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/3080). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.


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