Bot Fly
( Oestridae )


2014-0403-01100108-DIP00103-Oestridae[1212h55s,F,A,plant-manzanita]{BWurzburg}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Oestridae
(Leach ,1815 )
Common Name:Bot Fly
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Diptera
Suborder:Brachycera
Family:Oestridae
Taxon Code:DIP00103
ITIS/TSN:151717

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
Knowland Park, Knowland Park, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01100108

RECOGNITION
Description
Adult: A large, stout bodied fly that resembles a bee. Larva: Oval-bodied grubs with many spines that encircle the body.
Diversity
North America: More than 40 species in 6 genera of 3 subfamilies. Worldwide: About 180 species in 30 genera of 4 subfamilies.
Similar Taxa
Blow Flies (Calliphoridae) also cause myiasis in vertebrates.

BIOLOGY
Lifecycles vary greatly in Bot Fly species. The larvae of some species grow in the flesh of their hosts, while others grow within the host alimentary tracts.
Food
Adults do not feed (mouthparts are atrophied). Larvae are endoparasites of various mammals.
Importance
Oestridae larvae are internal parasites of mammals (including humans), including some that are of agricultural or ecological importance. Parasitism in humans causes extreme discomfort.
Range
Worldwide
Diversity
North America: More than 40 species in 6 genera of 3 subfamilies. Worldwide: About 180 species in 30 genera of 4 subfamilies.
Importance
Oestridae larvae are internal parasites of mammals (including humans), including some that are of agricultural or ecological importance. Parasitism in humans causes extreme discomfort.
Development
Some mammals resist attack by the Oestridae. So, the parasitism strategy of the female is more than just to lay eggs directly on the host. Females may lay eggs on an intermediate vector, such as a mosquito, house fly or tick. When these arthropods contact a host, larvae in the eggs sense the hosts warmth and proximity, hatch and burrow beneath the skin. Eggs may also be ingested by host. Mature larvae exit the host and pupation occurs in the soil. Adults eclose in about a month, or the pupae may overwinter. Eclosion occurs in the morning. Males perch on vegetation. Mating occurs in flight. Adults live about two weeks.

CREDITS
Photographer
Beth Wurzburg

References
Family Oestridae - Bot Flies. (bugguide.net/node/view/25501). Accessed March 3, 2017. .
ITIS.
Botfly. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botfly). Accessed March 3, 2017.
Rodent and Rabbit Bot Flies. Colorado Insects of Interest. (bspm.agsci.colostate.edu/files/2013/03/Rodent-Bots.pdf). Accessed March 3, 2017.


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