Green Lacewing
( Chrysopidae )


2010-0722-01100101-NEU01596-Chrysopidae[1842h53s,F,L,plant-rose-leaf]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Chrysopidae
(Schneider, 1851)
Common Name:Green Lacewing
Life Stage:(L) larva

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Neuropterida
Order:Neuroptera
Family:Chrysopidae
Taxon Code:NEU01596
ITIS TSN#:115081

LOCATION DETAILS
Location
ISMC Garden - Oakland, Melrose District, 5209 Congress Ave, Oakland
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01100101

RECOGNITION
These are soft-bodied insects with copper-colored eyes, long thread-like antennae, and lacy wings. To the naked eye the wings appear hairless, but under magnification short hairs can be seen along the edges and veins. Most species are green, but some are brown. Specimens turn yellowish once pinned. Larvae are flat and elongated (alligator-like) with large jaws. Debris-carrying larvae cover themselves with bits of litter, perhaps to deter predators.
Similar Taxa
Brown Lacewings (family Hemerobiidae) have different wing venation that and usually more oval wings and are typically brown. Mantisflies (Mantispidae) are similar in size and in appearnace, somewhat, but have raptorial forelegs.
Colors
Green, most commonly.

BIOLOGY
Food
Some adults are predators, others take liquids such as honeydew, and some feed on pollen. Larvae are predatory on other insects, especially aphids (sometimes called 'aphid lions'); will also consume larger insects, insect eggs, and pupae. Larvae maxillae are hollow, allowing a digestive secretion to be injected in the prey
Habitat
Common in grass and weeds and on tree or plant foliage. Adults are attracted to lights.
Development
Eggs are deposited at night, singly or in small groups; one female produces some 100–200 eggs. Eggs are placed on plants, usually where aphids are present nearby in numbers. Each egg is hung on a slender stalk about 1 cm long, usually on the underside of a leaf. Immediately after hatching, the larvae moult, then ascend the egg stalk to feed. They are voracious predators, attacking most insects of suitable size, especially soft-bodied ones (aphids, caterpillars and other insect larvae, insect eggs, and at high population densities also each other). The larvae may also occasionally bite humans, possibly out of either aggression or hunger. The larvae pupate in silken cocoons that are generally attached to the underside of leaves or stems.

HABITAT
Common in grass and weeds and on tree or plant foliage. Adults are attracted to lights.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar

REFERENCES
  • Integrated Taxonomic Information System TSN#115081
  • Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysopidae)


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