Leafhopper
( Cicadellidae )


2009-0621-01080125-HOM00954-Cicadellidae[2042h18s,L,A,pinned]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT
Leafhoppers coat their bodies and wings with a light dusting of water-repellent waxy material (brochosomes), sometimes distributed unevenly as bilaterally asymmetric whitish streaks. Leafhoppers have sound-producing organs (tymbals) at the base of abdomen (songs usually too faint for human ear). Several species are serious crop pests; some transmit plant pathogens (viruses, mycoplasma-like organisms, etc.).

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Cicadellidae
(Latreille ,1802 )
Common Name:Leafhopper
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Paraneoptera
Order:Hemiptera
Suborder:Auchenorrhyncha
Family:Cicadellidae
Taxon Code:HOM00954
ITIS/TSN:109171

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
BSA Camp Rancho Los Mochos, BSA Camp Rancho Los Mochos, 18450 Mines Rd., Livermore
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01080125

RECOGNITION
Body Length
2-30 mm, usually under 13 mm.
Diversity
About 3,000 described species in NA, around 22,000 described species worldwide (estimated global diversity more than 100,000 species ) arranged into about 25 subfamilies and almost 60 tribes

BIOLOGY
Food
Nymphs and adults feed on sap of above-ground stems or leaves of plants; some species are more host-specific than others
Habitat
nearly every habitat with vascular plants, incl. deserts, grasslands, wetlands, and forests
Distribution
Worldwide; in NA, some species migrate south in the fall, and back north in the spring
Diversity
About 3,000 described species in NA, around 22,000 described species worldwide (estimated global diversity more than 100,000 species ) arranged into about 25 subfamilies and almost 60 tribes
Development
Varies according to species; in general, female inserts several eggs into living tissue of host plant; eggs either remain dormant for a period ranging from a month to over a year, or develop and hatch within a few weeks; nymphs undergo five molts, reaching adult stage in several weeks or months

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Family Cicadellidae - Leafhoppers. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/146). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.


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