Click Beetle
( Elateridae )


2009-0621-01080125-COL00940-Elateridae[2048h34s,L,A,pinned]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Elateridae
(Leach ,1815 )
Common Name:Click Beetle
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Holometabola
Order:Coleoptera
Suborder:Polyphaga
Family:Elateridae
Taxon Code:COL00940
ITIS/TSN:113879

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
BSA Camp Rancho Los Mochos, BSA Camp Rancho Los Mochos, 18450 Mines Rd., Livermore
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01080125

RECOGNITION
Description
They are recognized by an elongate, narrow body form, with a large and free articulated prothorax and usually serrate antennae. Peculiar in being able to ""click"" and jump: if placed on their backs, click beetles use the flexible union of the prothorax and mesothorax (the prosternal spine fits into a groove on the mesosternum) to snap and jump usually falling right side up (in other beetles, the union of prothorax and mesothorax allows little or no movement). Body moderately to very elongate. Head usually prognathous. Frontal region highly variable, not or only slightly declined to vertical or inflexed at apex, forming frontal carina. Eyes usually large and protuberant, finely facetted. Frontoclypeal suture absent. Labrum free. Antennae usually 11-segmented and serrate, sometimes pectinate, bipectinate or flabellate. Tarsi 5-5-5, tarsomeres often simple, sometimes with ventral pubescent pads or membranous lamellae. Abdomen with five ventrites, the first four of which are connate.
Body Length
1-75 mm.
Diversity
About 970 described valid species in America, north of Mexico; an estimated 75-100 that are undescribed. Worldwide there are about 10,000 species in 400 genera, arranged into 17 subfamilies.

BIOLOGY
Food
Adults usually eat plants. Larvae eat newly planted seeds, roots, etc., some eat other insects.
Habitat
Found in all but aquatic and the most severe arctic and alpine habitats: adults on flowers/vegetation or under bark; larvae in rotten logs or soil. The larvae live in rotten wood, soil, litter and insect nests.
Distribution
Worldwide, and throughout North America.
Diversity
About 970 described valid species in America, north of Mexico; an estimated 75-100 that are undescribed. Worldwide there are about 10,000 species in 400 genera, arranged into 17 subfamilies.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
Family Elateridae - Click Beetles. (http://bugguide.net/node/view/115). Accessed March 12, 2016. .
ITIS.
Elateridae - Click Beetles, Wireworms. (http://tolweb.org/Elateridae/9190). Accessed September 25, 2016.


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