Dustywing
( Coniopterygidae )


2009-0620-01080125-NEU01511-Coniopterygidae[0848h21s,F,A,plant-leaf-manzanita]{EXD}-G.jpg

PHOTO COMMENT

IDENTIFICATION
Identification:Coniopterygidae
(Burmeister ,1839 )
Common Name:Dustywing
Life Stage:(A) adult

PHYLOGENY

Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Superorder:Neuropterida
Order:Neuroptera
Suborder:Hemerobiiformia
Family:Coniopterygidae
Taxon Code:NEU01511
ITIS/TSN:115075

LOCATION DETAILS
Location Name
BSA Camp Rancho Los Mochos, BSA Camp Rancho Los Mochos, 18450 Mines Rd., Livermore
County:Alameda County
ECI Site#:CA01080125

RECOGNITION
Description
Easily overlooked due to small size and crepuscular habits. Adult: Covered with white waxy powder which gives a granulated appearance to the surface when viewed close-up; wings whitish with reduced venation, and held tent-like over abdomen at rest; antennae long and slender; mouthparts moderately long and beak-like; legs relatively long, especially hindlegs. Larva: 5 simple eyes on each side of head, and needle-like jaws. Genus-level identifications are made using venation of both fore- and hind wings. Dustywings may be overlooked because of its superficial appearance to whiteflies (Aleyrodidae). Upon closer inspection they are differentiated by having longer legs (especially the hindlegs), antennae, longer beak-like mouthparts, and wings that are held tent-like at a more steep angle over the abdomen at rest.
Body Length
2.5-5 mm.
Diversity
America north of Mexico: 2 subfamilies, with 55 species in 8 genera in our area.
Similar Taxa
Dustywings have a superficial appeance to whiteflies.

BIOLOGY
Food
Adults and larvae feed on aphids, mealybugs, spider mites, scale insects, whiteflies, and other soft-bodied arthropods. Adults have been reported to feed on other substances, e.g. honeydew, scale secretions, and honey water.
Habitat
Predominantly arboreal.
Importance
May be more economically important as predators of homopteran pests than previously realized.
Distribution
Both subfamilies occur worldwide and throughout North America.
Diversity
America north of Mexico: 2 subfamilies, with 55 species in 8 genera in our area.
Active Period
Most active at dawn and dusk in spring and fall.
Importance
May be more economically important as predators of homopteran pests than previously realized.
Development
Adults flutter slowly among plants and usually lay single eggs on bark or leaves; two generations per year; overwinters as a larva.

CREDITS
Photographer
Eddie Dunbar
Insect Sciences Museum of California

References
ITIS.


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